Monday, April 27, 2015

A to Z April: W Reviews - Watchers by Dean Koontz/Wolf's Hour by Robert McCammon/Why Girls Are Weird by Pamela Ribon

There were a lot of books that begin with the letter W, and there were 3 that I just couldn't give up when I tried to narrow it down.  So today you get three mini-reviews!

First is Watchers by Dean Koontz.  I know that I've already talked about one book by Dean Koontz, Strangers, but I couldn't leave out my very favorite one of his books, one that I read over and over, and still remember so many things about.  They did make a movie out of it, and it starred one of the actors I'd had a crush on, Corey Haim. But the problem is that the characters weren't supposed to be young, so he was definitely not the right actor.  Well, that's not the only problem, the movie really just sucked.  But I still remember the dog, Einstein, a golden retriever of course since that is the kind of dog Dean Koontz owns and loves.  And so much about the dog that made me sad, and happy as well.  Here's the very short blurb from Goodreads:
When Travis Cornell and Nora Devon meet "Einstein", they are touched by the dog's intelligence. Einstein is one of two altered life forms escaped from a top-secret lab. The other--The Outsider--is a deadly hybrid. To protect themselves, Travis and Nora must learn to be deadly as well.


Second is Wolf's Hour  by Robert McCammon.  It's another one of the books I used to read over and over.  It contains as you might guess from the title, a werewolf.  But it also takes place during World War II with the Nazis, and so it is a time period that I read a lot from.   Here's the blurb from Goodreads:
D-Day is threatened, but one man could rip the heart of the Nazis -- with his bare claws....

He is Michael Gallatin, master spy, lover -- and werewolf. Able to change shape with lightning speed, to kill silently or with savage, snarling fury, he proved his talents against Rommel in Africa. Now he faces his most delicate, dangerous mission: to unravel the secret Nazi plan known as Iron Fist. From a parachute jump into occupied France to the lush corruption of Berlin, from the arms of a beautiful spy to the cold embrace of a madman's death machine, Gallatin draws ever closer to the ghastly truth about Iron Fist. But with only hours to D-Day, he is trapped in the Nazis' web of destruction....



The third book is kind of a chick lit type of story, although maybe a bit deeper than some of the others that I've shared.  It's called Why Girls Are Weird. Something I liked was that it had a companion book titled Why Moms Are Weird that was also good.  Here's the blurb from Goodreads:
She was just writing a story.
When Anna Koval decides to creatively kill time at her library job in Austin by teaching herself HTML and posting partially fabricated stories about her life on the Internet, she hardly imagines anyone besides her friend Dale is going to read them. He's been bugging her to start writing again since her breakup with Ian over a year ago. And so what if the "Anna K" persona in Anna's online journal has a fabulous boyfriend named Ian? It's not like the real Ian will ever find out about it.
The story started writing itself. 

Almost instantly Anna K starts getting e-mail from adoring fans that read her daily postings religiously. One devotee, Tess, seems intent on becoming Anna K's real-life best friend and another, a male admirer who goes by the name of "Ldobler," sounds like he'd want to date Anna K if she didn't already have a boyfriend. Meanwhile, the real Anna can't help but wonder if her newfound fans like her or the alter ego she's created. It's only a matter of time before fact and fiction collide and force Anna to decide not only who she wants to be with, but who she wants to be.

Have you read any of these books?  Do any sound good to you?  Will you add any to your TBR list?  And while you're here, don't forget to enter my giveaway below!


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10 comments:

  1. I *looove* Dean Koontz! I have around 15 books of his, I think, but I'm missing Watchers (will have to remedy that, haha). And the golden retrievers in his books... aww. Maybe that's why I like him so much. Well, one of the reasons anyway :) Great post!
    Guilie @ Quiet Laughter

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    1. Watchers was the very 2nd one of his books I got, I think, after Twilight Eyes. Thanks for visiting!

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  2. Hi Lisa you have quite a varied taste in literature. That must make your TBR list never ending. I would probably read the Chick Lit novel as I have recently started writing in that genre under a pseudonym and trying to get reviews as my new persona. The challenge ends soon - where has the month gone?

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    1. You hit that on the head, I will never, ever run out of things to read, and I keep adding more every day! You should give Why Girls are Weird a try, although it is a little edgier maybe than other chick lit books. And I can't believe that we're almost done! I'm kind of ready to be back to normal blogging though. Thanks for stopping by!

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  3. That third one certainly looks the best to me. Maybe it's because I'm a blogger myself. I can certainly relate to that more than to a warewolf spy ;)

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    1. You should give it a read! I don't feel like it got enough attention when it was out. Thanks for visiting!

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  4. Why Girls Are Weird looks interesting. I'm too scared to read Dean Koontz' books. :)
    @dino0726 from 
    FictionZeal - Impartial, Straighforward Fiction Book Reviews

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    1. I love Dean Koontz though, and unlike Stephen King, his books usually have the good guys winning. Thanks for stopping by!

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  5. There seems to be a number of novels coming out now with a similar theme-kid has blog, goes viral.

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    1. Why Girls Are Weird was about about 10 years ago I think, so it must be one of the forerunners!

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